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Hampton Roads Estate Planning and Administration Law Blog

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Things to Consider in Establishing a Charitable Giving Plan

For many individuals, leaving a legacy of charity is an important component of estate planning, but there are many factors involved in creating a charitable giving plan.

First, it is important to select causes that you believe in such as environmental, educational, religious or medical, or those dedicated to providing food and shelter to the poor. The number of charities you wish to give to depends on your available resources, as well as other beneficiaries of your estate. Many people opt to limit their selections to a handful of charities that are most important to them.


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Monday, January 1, 2018

A Primer on Irrevocable Trusts

Many individuals are aware that a will is one way to plan for the distribution of their assets after death. However, a comprehensive estate plan also considers other objectives such as planning for long-term care and asset protection. For this reason, it is essential to consider utilizing an irrevocable trust.


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Friday, December 1, 2017

What is Settlement Planning?

Settlement planning is a unique and expanding area of law that is designed to help individuals preserve benefits that have been received from a personal injury settlement, inheritance or judgment. The practice encompasses an array of legal services such as special needs planning, estate planning and financial planning. The objective is to assist clients with resolving claims and to create a structure to properly manage the funds.


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Wednesday, November 1, 2017

What are Letters Testamentary?

An individual who has been named as a personal representative or executor in a will has a number of important duties. These include gathering the deceased person's property and transferring it to the beneficiaries through a court-supervised process known as probate. In order to initiate this proceeding, the executor must first obtain what are referred to as letters testamentary. This document gives the executor the legal authority to administer the deceased person's estate.


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Sunday, October 1, 2017

When Will Power Is Not Enough

By: Joseph T. “Chip” Buxton III, Certified Elder Law Attorney*

One of the most common estate planning techniques is the Last Will and Testament.  However, if an individual passes assets at death by Will, usually someone needs to qualify before the Circuit Court in the jurisdiction in which they died.  This process is called Probate.  In Virginia, probate is supervised by private attorneys appointed by the court.


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Friday, September 1, 2017

Saving Taxes With Charitable Remainder Trusts

By: Joseph T. “Chip” Buxton III, Certified Elder Law Attorney*

There is a very powerful estate planning tool that may enable you to reduce your liability for income and estate taxes and diversify your assets in a tax-advantaged manner.  It is called a Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT).  Here is how it works.  A CRT is an irrevocable trust that makes annual or more frequent payments you, typically until you (and, if appropriate, your spouse) die.


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Tuesday, August 1, 2017

The Case for the Joint Living Trust

By: Joseph T. “Chip” Buxton III, Certified Elder Law Attorney*

In recent years, the revocable living trust has become the choice of record for estate planning.  A trust is a contract between the maker of the trust, normally called the Grantor, and the manager of the trust, typically called the Trustee.  The trust is a set of instructions whereby the Grantor enters into an agreement with the Trustee to manage certain assets r-titled in the name of the Trustee.  For example, a Grantor may have a large investment account.


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Saturday, July 1, 2017

Spousal Rights in Their Deceased Spouse's Estate

By: Joseph T. “Chip” Buxton III, Certified Elder Law Attorney*

On January 1, 1991, the Virginia General Assembly enacted a new statute regarding the rights of a spouse in their deceased spouse’s estate.  This statute introduced the concept of an “augmented estate.”  What this meant was that when a husband or wife died, the surviving spouse had certain rights in their marital property defined as the augmented estate, even if the decedent had written a will or a trust designed to disinherit their spouse.  The surviving spouse could simply file a claim in court for a share of the couples augmented estate and could elect to take 1/3 of the augmented estate if there were children or ½ of the augmented estate if there were no children.


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Thursday, June 1, 2017

Payable on Death

By: Joseph T. “Chip” Buxton III, Certified Elder Law Attorney*

Payable on Death (POD) accounts are used by many individuals so that when they pass away the account is designated to a specific individual or group of individuals.  They are used on bank accounts, brokerage accounts, retirement accounts and/or insurance policies.  Naming a beneficiary on a financial account can be useful from an estate planning perspective, but is dangerous in many cases.  For example, if you have a large bank account or brokerage account and you name a child as payable on death beneficiary, and the child predeceased you, that account will normally go through the probate process at your death and be distributed by your Executor or your Administrator of the estate.


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Monday, May 1, 2017

A Legacy Trust: Making Your Estate Last For Generations

By: Joseph T. “Chip” Buxton III, Certified Elder Law Attorney*

A great estate planning tool is a revocable living trust called a Dynasty Trust designed to last for multiple generations.  The Dynasty Trust contains a special provision for the continuation of the trust after your death for the benefit of your children and beyond.  At your death, the Dynasty Trust creates a separate “Legacy Trust” from the original trust for the benefit of each beneficiary you name.  The Legacy Trust protects the assets in the Legacy Trust from the creditors of the beneficiary, from estate and death taxes at the death of the beneficiary, from claims of their spouses in the event of a divorce, and can insulate assets in the trust from being deemed “available resources” in the event the beneficiary seeks public assistance under Medicaid for nursing home care.


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Saturday, April 1, 2017

Legacy Trusts(s) for Children

By: Joseph T. “Chip” Buxton III, Certified Elder Law Attorney

A Dynasty Trust contains special provisions for the continuation of the trust after your death(s) for the benefit of your beneficiaries.  The Trust provides for the creation of a Legacy Trust.  A separate Legacy Trust will be set up from the original trust for each of the beneficiaries you have identified.  The Legacy Trust is designed to protect the assets in the Legacy Trust from the creditors of the beneficiary, from estate and death taxes at the death of the beneficiary, from claims of spouses in the event of a divorce, and to insulate assets in the trust from being deemed available resources in the event of the beneficiary’s disability in case he or she is otherwise eligible to receive public assistance such as Medicaid or supplemental social security income.

In most cases, the initial beneficiary may serve as the trustee of his/her Legacy Trust, and as such, will have full discretion with respect to the investment of the assets so long as they remain in the trust.


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